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Currency - All prices are in AUD

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Steve's Rare Coins

Sacagawea-Native American Dollars

Sacagawea and Native America $1 Dollar Coin Programs

The Sacagawea dollar has been minted every year since 2000, although not released for general circulation from 2002 through 2008 and again in 2012 due to its general unpopularity with the public and low business demand for the coin. These coins have a copper core clad by manganese brass, giving them a distinctive golden color. The coin features an obverse depicting Sacagawea with her infant son, Jean Baptiste Charbonneau by Glenna Goodacre. From 2000 to 2008, the reverse featured an eagle design by Thomas D. Rogers. The coin's reverse, designed by Mint sculptor-engraver Thomas D. Rogers, depicts a soaring eagle.

In 2007, the Native American $1 Coin Act was signed into law, with the first coin of the new series released in 2009. The act specified in part that the one dollar coin shall depict "images celebrating the important contributions made by Indian tribes and individual Native Americans to the development of the United States and the history of the United States." The act also called for the removal of the date from the obverse and "E PLURIBUS UNUM" from the reverse of the coin, opting instead to add them to the edge.

The program, set to last until 2016, requires that the reverse of the dollar depict a new design every year. In order to determine which design to depict on the coins, officials from the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, the Native American Caucus and the National Congress of American Indians, the consulting organizations for the program, appoint a liaison to the United States Mint. Between twelve and fifteen themes are selected after consultation with the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Institution. At this point, the consulting organizations supply the Mint with written comments regarding the themes. The suggestions are then sent to the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee, where a theme is recommended. After reviewing the recommendations and input from the contributing organizations, the selected theme is finalized, at which point designs are produced that represent the theme. Once designs are created, the consulting organizations and the National Museum of the Native American are consulted, and the designs are sent to the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee for approval. Based on all comments and recommendations received, the Mint selects a final design that is recommended to the Secretary of the Treasury for approval.